When you hear the name Kingston and HyperX, the first thing that you think of, or at least I do, is quality computer memory, USB flash drives, and more recently solid state hard drives. However, over the past couple years, they have been slowly creeping their way into the gaming peripheral arena with the introduction of several gaming headsets, such as the HyperX “Mav” Cloud, which we reviewed last year here, as well as original HyperX Cloud Headset here. As the name suggests this is a follow-up to the original HyperX Cloud headset, however, the HyperX CloudX takes the proven formula from the original and applies it for this Xbox One & PC headset.

As the name suggests this is a follow-up to the original HyperX Cloud headset, however, the HyperX CloudX takes the proven formula from the original and applies it for this Xbox One & and PC headset.

Most of this review is also based on the Kingston HyperX Cloud II headset, as this is the same model that was used for reference. Both the Cloud II and the CloudX are a 1:1 headset, so you’re getting the same performance with either headset. That said, I recommend checking out our review of the HyperX Cloud II headset, here, to get an idea on how these sound and perform. In this review, I’m going to focus on the differences between the two.

What’s included in the box?

  • Kingston HyperX CloudX headset (2FT cable length)
  • 1 Pair of black/green ear cups
  • Detachable microphone
  • Hard shell carrying case
  • 6FT extension cable

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So what’s different?

Coming from the previous Cloud II headset, the biggest difference is that the CloudX is a stereo headset and not a surround sound headset. Now while the sounds like a big deal on people, once I put the headphones on, I really didn’t experience a huge change here. The sounds that were generated were very similar to both my Cloud II as well as a more expensive Astro A40 headset, just with slightly less bass.  As far as gameplay is concerned, I was easily able to hear the footsteps or bullets whizzing past my headset, just as easily as I could hear the roar of the engines and the tires squealing when I was playing a racing title. I didn’t notice anything that would put off even the hardcore gamer. However, unless you absolutely need surround sound and there are gamers out there that do, I can’t recommend the CloudX to you. I do understand why they reach for the surround sound vs stereo, however, there are other headsets out there that manage to pull that off but for quite more money. For everyone else, this stereo headset is more than capable.

However, unless you absolutely need surround sound and there are gamers out there that do, I can’t recommend the CloudX to you. I do understand why they reach for the surround sound vs stereo, however, there are other headsets out there that manage to pull that off but for quite more money. For everyone else, this stereo headset is more than capable. Another change up between Kingston HyperX Cloud II and the recently released CloudX is the departure of the USB volume controller.  With the Cloud II, included was a USB volume controller that was perhaps one of bigger highlights. It provided ease of access to the volume for the headset and microphone, mute button access and the ability to use the 7.1 virtual sound. DSC_0207

This is with gone with the CloudX and instead, a more simplified and conventional volume controller is used. You’ll still be able to adjust the volume to the headset and mute your microphone, but that’s it. The compromise is that you won’t have the ability to adjust the microphone volume via the headset and will have to do so via the Xbox One system settings or volume mixer on PC. Sadly, this also ends up turning out to being the weakest part of the CloudX as well. Adjusting the volume isn’t very precise and I was able to rapid shake the cord which caused the volume wheel to move on its own. That said, I don’t know if that’s due to the production of the piece of if my headset is defective in that regard.

One added feature of the CloudX, however, is the addition of the hard shell carry case. If you’ve every owned a Xbox One Wireless Elite controller or a pair of Beats headphones, you’ll be familiar with what this is. Since the CloudX is marketed towards Xbox One gamers, it only makes sense that a carrying case to be provided. That way, one can carry their headset in style and without any worries about damaging it, when they head out to a friends house or even somewhere else in the world for a gaming event.

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Since the headset connects to their your Xbox One controller or PC via a 3.5mm jack, this means it’s pretty much compatible with anything. Smartphones, camcorders, mp3 players, as long as it takes a 3.5mm jack, you’re golden. Everything is plug and play, just plug it in and you’re good to go. As a testament to that, I’ve worn the CloudX during my exercise routines, cutting the grass or even blocking out the kids when I’m in the car. This is also good for those who own the updated Xbox One controllers or even the Xbox One Elite, which is the very same controller I used for my testing. It also works with the Xbox One chat pad as well, despite initial claims on the internet stating that it did not. 

The CloudX also retains the knitted cord and comes in a black & silver color scheme that matches the color of the headset. Boosting the same endurance of the Cloud II headset, this cord is pretty tough, so you won’t have to worry about it being tugged or violently ripped out of your Xbox One controller. Not saying that that will happen, but it’s been my experience at either crowd gaming events or even at home with small children. Adding on to that, the headset is solid. Great construction all the way around, not one piece seems like it’s ready to break off at a moments notice.  Yet, at the same time, it isn’t too heavy that the headset feels like a chore wear during those long hours of playing some Halo 5 or just chatting away with friends.

Kingston HyperX CLoud X Headset Box Bare

  • Everything you loved about the Cloud II, Just for the green team

Summary

At the end of the day, if you're looking for a sub $100 headset for the Xbox One, then the Kingston HyperX CloudX is right up your alley. Comfortable, great-sounding, solid construction and light on the old wallet or purse. And don't let the cheap price scare you off as this is a premium headset for both the Xbox One or PC. The only negative is the lack of microphone adjustment but short of that, the CloudX is hard to pass up. Well, that and that blasted lid for the microphone jack is still easily displaced.

Still, you should be able to live with that. Right?

Pros:

  • Study construction
  • Works for anything with a 3.5mm jack connector
  • Under $100

Cons:

  • The volume adjuster is fickle
  • No surround sound
  • That darned lid for the microphone is still easily lost
4.5

About The Author

Keith Mitchell
Editor-in-chief and all-around good guy!

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Outerhaven. Fan of all video games and technology. Loves long walks with very long swords in hand and puppies. Oh and don't forget...DARK SOULS!