Simplicity Effy Sews Cosplay School Girl Uniform Review

If I had to pick any time in the world to be a cosplayer, it would be now. There are so many resources available now for cosplayers, making it so much easier to take part in your favorite hobby while still maintaining a full-time job and a life. While COSPLAY by McCALL’S has been garnering a lot of interest because of their flashy packaging, Simplicity decided to take a more simple approach to their cosplay line. If you’re looking for Simplicity cosplay patterns, you’ll need to pay closer attention because they live in standard Simplicity packaging. This can be a silly approach if you’re trying to attract the cosplay crowd, but Simplicity knows that cosplayers will buy a good pattern even if it’s not in a flashy envelope. This is pretty smart in a sense, because that means people who do not cosplay may purchase the patterns since they’ll be living among all of the other Simplicity envelopes in the pattern section.

Here are the specs:

Skill level: Intermediate

Sizes: 4, 6, 8, 10, 12

Pattern number: 8160

If you’ve used patterns before, 8160 will not be intimidating in any way – at least from a cosmetic perspective. Since it comes in standard packaging you know you need to carefully take it out of the paper envelope, unfold the pattern and directions neatly, and then struggle to fold them back up again once you’re done.

This pattern is particularly useful for any cosplayer who wants traditional Japanese school girl uniforms. You will only find the sailor collar tops in this envelope – if you want western style Japanese school uniforms you need a different pattern. I have made these uniforms before this pattern existed and to do so I mixed patterns together that I found on eBay. I then made my own pleated skirt just by cutting out a huge rectangle and hoping that I’d have enough fabric left to make a skirt after hours of measuring and folding. This pattern takes all of that guesswork away. Now making uniforms can be quick and easy! Perhaps I’ll be Usagi next?

I like this pattern not only because it makes my life easier, but because it has variations on the lengths of the skirt and the sleeves. You can choose from short sleeve, long sleeve, or puffy sleeves like you’d find on Chibi Usa’s uniform. There are also pattern pieces included to make a bow or scarf for under your sailor collar. The pattern isn’t incredibly intimidating. It is 16 pieces total and you’ll need about 12 pieces to complete one uniform. The only thing that you may need to change on your own is the length of the pleated skirt – since this pattern only provides two lengths, one several inches above the knee and one just above the knee. Some people may need to adjust the length to accommodate different heights or skirt length preferences.

I am always happy to see new cosplay patterns, and I’m always interested in new patterns that can make my life easier. This pattern isn’t a necessity if you have figured out how to make a school uniform already, but if you’re like me and don’t want to worry about doing all of the guesswork yourself, this pattern provides a great alternative that requires half the effort. I have a terrible habit of tossing out the modified patterns I make thinking I’ll never need them again. This pattern would also be great for someone who is still getting comfortable with sewing and could use guidance. School uniforms are pretty basic but can be intimidating for less experienced cosplayers. Once you do make one, you’ll want to make more of them because they’re very comfortable. Nothing beats a comfortable cosplay on the last day of a convention.

*This item was provided for review.

About The Author

LizLiz

Elizabeth is an avid reader of manga and enjoys attending conventions in cosplay. Please follow me on social media to keep up with my latest reviews and cosplay progress.